The World SF Blog

Speculative Fiction from Around the World

Author Week #4: Samit Basu

I’m delighted to say it’s time for our fourth Author Week feature on the World SF Blog!

This time we turn our spotlight on Indian author Samit Basu, a recent contributor to the just-released The Apex Book of World SF 2 and author of the wonderful Indian superhero novel Turbulenceavailable now in paperback or Kindle edition from Titan Books in the UK (and coming soon to the United States!).

We have 3 copies of the paperback to give away to our readers, courtesy of Titan. As always on the World SF Blog, the competition is open to anyone, anywhere in the world. For a chance to win, simply comment down below, and make sure to fill in your e-mail address so we know to contact you if you won. Competition closes on Friday, and we’ll announce the winners on Monday.

ETA: the giveaway is now closed, and the winners (picked with a random number generator) are: Jash, Nuno and Galoot. Congratulations!

Coming up this week we have an original short story from Samit; an interview with the author; a review of the novel by Anil Menon; and a guest-post from the author.

‘For wicked wit, for post-modern superheroics, for sheer verbal energy and dazzle, Samit Basu doesn’t so much push the envelope as fold it into an n-dimensional hyper-envelope, address it to your hind-brain and mail it with a rail gun.’- Mike Carey (X-men, Lucifer, the Felix Castor series)

‘You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll gasp and you will demand a sequel.’- Ben Aaronovitch (Doctor Who, Rivers of London)

Aman Sen is smart, young, ambitious and going nowhere. He thinks this is because he doesn’t have the right connections – but then he gets on a plane from London to Delhi and discovers, a few days later, that he has turned into a communications demigod, able to control and manipulate all networks, including the internet. And he’s not the only one with a secret.

Everyone on Aman’s flight now has extraordinary abilities corresponding to their innermost desires. Vir, an Indian Air Force pilot, can now fly. Uzma, a British-Pakistani aspiring Bollywood actress, now possesses infinite charisma. Tia, a housewife from the troubled Indian north-east, can now live out all the lives she dreamt of by splitting into multiple bodies. And these are just the nice ones. Terrible new forces have been unleashed. Businessmen, politicians, criminals, each with their own agenda. One of these is Jai, an indestructible one-man army with an old-fashioned goal – military conquest of the world. And there’s another, even more sinister force at work. A mind capable of manipulating mobs, of driving humans and superhumans into an all-destroying frenzy.

Aman and his rag-tag collective of superhumans find themselves in grave danger in a part of the world that needs radical change much more than it needs protection. They must decide what to do with their powers and their lives – and quickly. Aman dreams of uniting their powers to fight the world’s real villains – faceless, amorphous corporations, corrupt government officials, religious fanatics. Of ensuring that their new powers aren’t wasted on costumed crime-fighting, celebrity endorsements, or reality television. He wants to help those who need it most – untold millions without food, power, schools or voices. He intends to heal the planet. Save the world. But with each step he takes, he finds helping some means harming others, playing with lives, making huge, potentially disastrous decisions. Will they actually make the world better or will it all end, as 80 years of superhero fiction suggest, in a meaningless, explosive slugfest?

TURBULENCE is a hyper-real novel set in an over-the-top world. It features the 21st-century Indian subcontinent in all its insane glory – F-16s, Bollywood, radical religious parties, nuclear plants, cricket, terrorists, luxury resorts, crazy TV shows – but is essentially about two very human questions.

How would you feel if you actually got what you wanted?

What would you do if you were given the power to change the world?

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August 27, 2012 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , ,

18 Comments

  1. In for the giveaway.

    Comment by Ronak M Soni | August 27, 2012

  2. Definitely very keen to read Turbulence, and looking forward to the rest of this week’s posts.

    Comment by Maureen Kincaid Speller | August 27, 2012

  3. Samit Basu is a genre of his own.

    Comment by Jash | August 27, 2012

  4. Sounds crazy good.

    Comment by Brent Millis | August 27, 2012

  5. If you can ship to Canada, I’m in, sounds like a blast.

    Comment by Corey Redekop | August 27, 2012

  6. I guess India shipping will be covered by default. In for the giveaway :D

    Comment by Bhupi_san | August 27, 2012

  7. I would Love to read this. On The Future Fire we have been talking so much about SFF from the non – Anglo perspective. These are impossible to get hold of here in Estonia, so this would be my chance to get acquainted.

    Comment by Martha Hubbard (@MeSaare) | August 27, 2012

  8. Sounds like a good read!

    Comment by Val | August 27, 2012

  9. Very curious about this one.

    Comment by Nuno Fonseca | August 27, 2012

  10. That sounds great. I’m definitely in for the giveaway.

    Comment by John L Robinson | August 27, 2012

  11. Sounds awesome!

    Comment by Eliza | August 27, 2012

  12. Sounds like a stunner!

    Comment by Glen Mehn | August 28, 2012

  13. Sounds good! I liked Electric Sonalika in the Book of World SF 2 and I’d be keen to check out some more of Samit’s work. :)

    Comment by Michelle Goldsmith | August 28, 2012

  14. I cannot say how awesome that book sounds.

    Comment by Andrew | August 28, 2012

  15. Oh. This is fascinating! Love the plot. Count me in! :)

    Comment by MaHelgad | August 28, 2012

  16. sounds brilliant! would love to review it here in Karachi.

    Comment by Mahvesh | August 29, 2012

  17. I read a bit of this in a promo version at Eastercon, and want to read more.

    Comment by Penny Schenk (@galoot) | August 30, 2012

  18. Thank you everyone for the wonderful comments! And thanks so much World SF for having this author week. It couldn’t have ended better – my first novel, The Simoqin Prophecies, came out as an ebook worldwide (ten years after I wrote it) as this week ended.

    Comment by Samit Basu | September 1, 2012


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