The Future is… Japanese!

Nick Mamatas has announced the table of contents for new anthology The Future Is Japanese, published by Haikasoru, and collecting brand-new SF stories from a mix of Japanese and foreign writers. Table of Contents: “Mono No Aware” by Ken Liu “The Sound of Breaking Up” by Felicity Savage “Chitai Heiki Koronbīn” by David Moles “The... Continue Reading →

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Original Content: Interview with Sayuri Ueda, author of The Cage of Zeus (Haikasoru)

We've been offering original content throughout this relaunch week: today, Charles Tan interviews Japanese author Sayuri Ueda, whose novel The Cage of Zeus is published by Haikasoru (translated by Takami Nieda). The Rounds are humans with the sex organs of both genders. Artificially created to test the limits of the human body in space, they... Continue Reading →

Monday Original Content: Brittain Barber reviews Ogawa Issui’s The Lord of the Sands of Time

The Lord of the Sands of Time Ogawa Issui  Reviewed by Brittain Barber I am going to go ahead and assume that no readers out there are currently wondering what would happen if aliens invaded ancient Japan, or how time traveling cyborgs would fight them off. Even if the cyborgs had been skipping through time... Continue Reading →

Japanese Translator Cathy Hirano Interviewed

Cathy Hirano - translator of the "Mirror Sword and Shadow Prince, the second volume in Noriko Ogiwara’s Tales of the Magatama series, published by VIZ Media’s Haikasoru imprint", is interviewed by Alexander O. Smith over at the Tokyo Translators Group site. After graduating from ICU, I reviewed English YA books for possible Japanese publication and occasionally... Continue Reading →

Haikasoru Mirror Sword and Shadow Prince Giveaway

The Haikasoru blog is currently having a giveaway for  Mirror Sword and Shadow Prince by  Noriko Ogiwara and the contest mechanics piqued my interest: ...just write a little bit of what you think about this question: When readers think “fantasy” they often think of stories taking place in a pseudo-medieval Europe. Is this just due to the facts... Continue Reading →

Translating Genre from Japan (Haikasoru Week addendum)

Haikasoru Week is over, but as an addendum, why not check out beatrice.com, who have just run an interview with two of Haikasoru's translators, Jim Hubbert and Cathy Hirano: To give just one example, the word miya, which is used in both books, means “palace” according to the Japanese-English dictionary. That seems simple enough—but what image does the... Continue Reading →

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